News

Thanksgiving

Hello everyone

This week a reader sent me a request for a picture of a crewel design that I had done many years ago.  She said that she had come across it on the internet but had since been unable to locate it.  In my search for this picture I came across several crewel projects that I had done in about 1998 which I had almost forgotten about, and took me on a little trip down memory lane.  As we approach Thanksgiving it is a wonderful time to take stock of all the good we have experienced in our lives and how much we have to be grateful for – it will make you smile!

Crewel Project
Crewel Project

When we had made the decision to leave Zimbabwe and move to Cape Town in about 1999 I decided I wanted to teach embroidery – at the time I had done cross stitch and was gaining an immense interest in surface embroidery, in particular Crewel embroidery in wool.  I discovered that the EGA in the USA offered a correspondence course on teaching surface embroidery, so I applied and was accepted into the Mastercraftsman course.  One of the suggestions was that I taught a live class to gain experience, so I appealed to all my friends who agreed enthusiastically and we formed my first class.  There was a total of 8 students and they came to my house every week for a period of 6 weeks in which time we stitched this piece of crewel embroidery.  Am not sure if they actually learned anything but we had a lot of fun!

Class of 1999
First Class of 1999

I remember clearly being rapped over the knuckles by my mentor at the EGA when I sent her a picture of us in the class – she said “I was very concerned to see the coffee cups and glasses on the table – this is not allowed in our workshops”!    When I think back on my first classes and total lack of experience I feel so grateful for the opportunities that have been afforded me since then and how it has led to where I am today.  Needless to say I never did finish the Crewel Embroidery course with the EGA, although I had some wonderful mentors during that time which had a huge influence on my work,  but since then I have taught numerous classes and although I dont profess to know it all, I feel that I have gained a better understanding of “putting myself in my students shoes” and as I result have been able to reach out to people from all over the globe through my books, kits and classes.

crewel project 2000
crewel project 2000
later crewel piece from Crewel & Surface Embroidery Book.
later crewel piece from Crewel & Surface Embroidery Book.

I feel so grateful that I am able to do the work that I love and if I havent said it before THANK YOU for making it possible and for your ongoing support and encouragement.  It is always helpful to hear your ideas and what you would like to see more of or less of so please do let me know.  Next week it will be my great pleasure to share with you the work of one of my students, meanwhile wherever you are be it winter, spring, summer or autumn have a wonderful weekend and many happy stitching hours.  Trish

19 thoughts on “Thanksgiving

  1. HI TRISH
    YOUR WORKS ARE MIND BLOWING. LOVE GOING THROUGH YOUR EMBROIDERY WORKS. I DO A LOT OF HAND EMBROIDERY MAINLY WITH LONG AND SHORT AND I LOVE BLENDING THE COLORS INTO ONE ANOTHER. IT GIVES SUCH A LOVELY FINISH.
    SANDYA

    Like

  2. Hello Trish! I love your blog and your pictures are both lovely and look like lots of fun—especially your guild meeting!! On the subject of using your needlepainting items, I was thinking of a small kerchief for the head or a headband….I’m trying to get ideas for my 18-25 year old grands….I had considered hankies–still might do that one but do not think they would ever actually use it then….am wondering if a headband or kerchief would need to be lined? In something stronger than batiste? The kerchief I’m thinking of would go on the head (so even I could wear it!!) but I suppose one for around the neck would be acceptable too. Any hints as to what your new book at the publisher’s is about?…awaiting its debut!!!

    Like

  3. Must have tea or coffee during workshops but make sure to keep them well away from the stitching! I love crewel embroidery but also do goldwork, and many other things. Love your posts.

    Like

  4. These are beautiful designs, Trish, and much more to my personal taste than some of your later ones: this is because I am ornithophobic and go into a panic attack when I first see pictures of birds. I would love a book of your non-bird designs.

    Like

  5. Hi Trish, I love your work! You have inspired me to try needle painting. Your books, (I have them all), are so helpful. I was wondering if you would consider showing the back side of your work. ( Am I rude for asking?) I am struggling with the threads criss-crossing and ending up looking a mess. How should the back side look? I appreciate any thoughts you may have.

    Like

    1. I will show you the back side of my work in a future post Joann – it is not that neat! When taking your threads across the back of the work you should always run them under previous threads, this helps to achieve a neater effect. Trish

      Like

  6. Hi Trish! Thanks for sharing a bit of your own history with us – and also for the great pictures! Always nice to start the day with beautiful embroidery photos. 🙂
    And I think I can say it for everyone who follows your work: thank you for all the love you put in your work, and for spreading this art world-wide.

    Like

  7. Beautiful work Trish. I have a question. What do you do with your work when you have finished? Do you frame them or make the pieces into something? Do you start with a plan or just the idea to try something new? I have several small things that I have done but don’t really want embroidery all over my walls and want to do more but want purpose for the items. I would welcome your thoughts.

    Like

    1. Thanks Maria this is such a good question! Actually I only frame a few of my pieces the rest are stored or given to friends and relatives for presents. As I do so many pieces for books, kits and workshops I don’t always consider what I will do with them afterwards but rather concentrate on the design. However I have been asked this question many times – what do we do with the finished embroidery? So at present am researching ways to make up our needle painting into finished items such as needle book, cushion, bags etc etc and hoping to introduce a series of kits next year that will include the pattern and materials for finishing your project. Trish

      Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s