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Whitework Impressions

Hello everyone

I hope your week is going well.  I have had to put embroidery business aside this week as have been busy helping my young daughter study for her first exams – this is rather like going back to school but much much harder as I have to google everything!  I knew I was no good at maths back at school but feel I have regressed further or has it got harder?

After our previous discussion and your subsequent, enthusiastic response to the idea of whitework embroidery kits I have  managed to complete one or two projects and hope to be able to release the first kit next month.    I refer to this style (or rather my own style of whitework) as Whitework Impressions because it is not pure whitework in the sense that I have added some colour.  There is one in particular that I want to share with you, mainly because it is so radical and far removed from our safe pastel and antique shades that we normally use in our embroidery,  and that is the Moonlit Owl.  I was discussing black and white illustration with my youngest daughter and saying how much I liked it and she said “why dont you do some embroidery in black and white Mum?”  The seed was sown and so I approached the idea (a bit nervously) with needle and thread in hand.  At first I mainly used shades of grey but then decided to “go for it” and added some pure black in the background.

 

The project is stitched on a white, fine quality Swiss batiste fabric – as I like the way the sheer background contrasts with the stark white.  I have used DMC Floche, Broder and some stranded cotton. Here it is:

Moonlit Owl
Moonlit Owl

Unfortunately I am unable to make contact with the copyright owner of this design.  It was originally put up on Pinterest as a free pattern – which of course it is, if not used for commercial purposes, but since then I have traced it back to one of the vintage Vogart transfers.  The  original company has been taken over by another company and apparently all the Vogart transfers are still under copyright, so it seems that I will not be able to use it, however I plan to design something similar which can be used in kit form.

I would love to hear what you think of the black and white theme, or if anyone is able to shed more light on the copyright for Vogart Vintage Transfers.   Meantime wherever you are be it winter, spring, summer or autumn have a wonderful weekend and happy stitching.  Trish

78 thoughts on “Whitework Impressions

  1. Hello Trish. I found this pattern on ebay (where else) purchased pattern (1960) in all its glory uncut for $7.25, 2003b #on envelop. Pattern has more transfer items on same page with owl. Had to get pattern while the getting was good, before another person snatched it up, ebay # 131177060633, Will be happy to send pics of pattern. Pat, San Antonio,

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    1. Thank you so much Patricia it is indeed the pattern I have used and I have a copy of it but unfortunately I am still not allowed to use it for commercial purposes unless I get permission from the manufacturer – who is VOgart who no longer exists! If it was more than 100 years old then the copyright would have expired but it is 1960. THanks for the offer tho. Trish

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  2. Hi Trish, It looks beautiful, can’t wait for the kit to come out. Thank you for the Iris kit i received it last Tuesday. Sue Batt

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  3. I’ve only recently started embroidery again and your owl is stunning. I have trouble getting the ring material to work on so a kit would be lovely. Thank you so much for sharing it.

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  4. Absolutely stunning. I absolutely love whitework and the use of white, grey and black on sheer fabric is amazing. It is so out the box which I love. I hope you can source the information you need.

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  5. I love the owl design and the white, grey and black colours. I enjoy stitching in a traditional “white” Whitework way but your project is wonderful…different and beautiful. It looks fabulous. I can’t wait to see the designs you develop for kits.

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  6. Just loved the gorgeous owl he’s magnificent and wondered how he would look done on a black background and changing the black to a grey. Just my thinking outside the square thinking and sure I would enjoy tackling him. He is different than your usual kits but that good as I need new things to try, so a big thanking you to you and your daughter.

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  7. On the topic of helping your daughter with her studies I am a professional tutor and I have a few suggestions. Some of these ideas may work for you in other teaching-learning situations.
    Firstly, the Maths content of the curriculum has changed and is now more difficult for the same age group. Today’s students have better calculators and gadgets, and they just need to know more that did students in the past.
    Secondly, you have not forgotten your Maths completely. Everything you ever learned is stored away safely in your long-term memory. You can retrieve it, but you need prompts, and you need your mind and body to be relaxed so that the prompts work effectively. The more mature brain has also had time to sort and classify the information so you actually are better at everything now that when you originally studied it years ago. You also have life experience which enables you to perceive the problems and solutions more accurately.
    Thirdly, there is a treasure trove of help on the internet already and lots of it is free. For Maths I suggest you try The Khan Academy. There are many other sites. There are lots of clips on Youtube as well. Google in whatever topic your daughter is revising and you will be amazed. There is so much help available from generous people.
    Fourthly, remember that this is your daughter’s work and she was supposed to learn it week by week as it was presented to her in class. A little help and support is fine (that is how I make my living), but each student must accept responsibility for their own studies. Low effort = low results.
    I suggest your daughter does 45 minutes of intensive exercise every day while she is revising. This really makes a big difference to brain function. She should have a healthy diet. Drink plenty of water, especially in the afternoon, so that the brain is sufficiently hydrated. No alcohol, because it dehydrates the brain. Do a relaxation exercise every day and then use the relaxed mind for revising the more difficult work. Get adequate sleep and study in 2 hour blocks. The brain really does learn new material better in the early morning.
    I am sure you already know most of these tips. You run a business and you have not developed your talents in the dark. Just as with an embroidery class, build confidence as you build skill.

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  8. I am normally not a big fan of whitework (I like more colors and variety) but Iove this effect of the black and white! Hope you are able to find the info about the pattern, but I am sure you can come up with something, too!

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  9. I just love the colours Trish – very different. Would love to do something like that – just don’t get the time.

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    1. Hi Trish – its very, very busy with very long hours and I miss you and all my embroidery friends and I miss doing embroidery. But hoping to employ a Manager so I can get back to my soul food!! I love your new whitework!! When is your book coming out? Love Debra

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  10. Hi Trish. I think the owl is just fabulous, I am a huge fan and can’t wait for you to get the rights to it! Weather here pretty up and down – great yesterday and rubbish today but then that is the Isle of Man for you. Hope the exams go smoothly.
    Luv
    El
    x

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    1. Hi El lovely to hear from you it has been some time? Glad you like the owl am going to make a plan to re-draw my own similar design. Hope you are keeping well despite the weather? Trish

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  11. Trish, you have done it again. I have never been excited about white work, let alone, radical designs. However, your owl is beautiful and would be a welcome addition to my collection of your needlework.
    Abundant thank yous for “doing it again”.
    D. 🙂

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    1. Thanks Renee. It is dot stitch which is like seed stitch. I have varied the colours of the dots from white into dark grey to give it a shaded look. Cant stay away from shading!

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    1. THanks Audrey. The intitial kits will probably be in blues, teals etc but will certainly introduce the black and white theme along the way.

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  12. whow my darling daughter has come up trumps with something so totally different and beautiful.
    Apart from my passion fro owls I think this is outstanding Love you Mum xx

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  13. I think that is fantastic, brilliant! I like the black and white palette with the surface stitches I think it is dramatic. I would get such a kit.

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    1. Thanks Yvette – yes seems owls are very popular. In my home country in Africa they are used to ward off thieves and I know they are considered good luck in some cultures.

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  14. Wow! You continue to amaze me with always finding new ways to branch out and add something unexpected to your collection. I have several of your kits and all your books and would love to add this to my workbasket. Thanks for all the hard work and keeping needlework fresh and vibrant.

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  15. Hi Trish, Your “Moonlit Owl” is beautiful! Your ideas and “thinking out the box” are an inspiration. Looking forward to the course for the Guild on the 11th June. Hope you are keeping well. Dawn.

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    1. Thanks Gillian I will certainly try and design something similar with the owl idea, they see to be very popular at the moment, in some cultures they are supposed to be good luck and I know in Africa they are used to keep burglurs out:) – it is always better to use one’s own designs in the end. Trish

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    1. DMC Floche, cotton a border and some DMC stranded cotton. These will be included in any kits I provide as they are very hard to source through the normal chanels. Trish

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  16. As always, your work is beautiful! I’m sorry, however, but I don’t care for owls
    and they seem to be a very popular theme just now.

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    1. Thanks Karen. It is a lovely owl pattern and would love to be able to use it but think it might not be possible so will see if I can design my own. Trish

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    1. Sounds gorgeous Rosemary just the sound of the reds, golds and creams, so rich. Look forward to seeing it next Friday might pinch your idea for one of the projects:) Trish

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